The Flying Goat Camp & Hostel: All About Community In Geyikbayırı, Turkey (Climbing Hostel Review)

The Flying Goat Camp & Hostel is the new kid on the block in Geyikbayiri. They are distinct in the area for their smaller size and communal vibe.

Heading into their second year of operation, owner Fleur Derks wanted to emphasize a hostel aesthetic. The space features a community kitchen (the first camp to do so), they organize family dinners and movie night, and encourage communing in common spaces, like the upstairs “living room” that has a fireplace along with various boardgames.

I had chosen this camp because it looked relaxed, friendly, and picturesque. It lived up to expectations.

IMG_5569
Photo by friend of the author

The Vibe:

We arrived at night and quickly felt at home.

The place smelled sweet, citrus and pomegranates wafted in the air. A gentle breeze rolled through. The silhouette of mountains called forth the adventure to come.

We walked through the front gate, met Fleur and Mümin (5x Turkish national climbing champ), and were handed beers. After a tour we made the rounds of introductions. Everyone from the staff to the guests were friendly and welcoming.

As far as the people, there were climbers ranging from beginner to pro, professional guides to computer scientists, and if you were going solo, it was easy to find a partner or a group to tag along with.

For our stay, we rented a two-person bungalow, one of eight or so that are lain between fruit trees like gingerbread houses with a Turkish twist.

IMG_5179
Photo by the author
ottoman pumpkin lamp
Photo source: Flying Goat
turkish tyling at flying goat
Photo source: Flying Goat
IMG_5564
Photo by friend of the author

Small details stood out, like the Ottoman pumpkin lights in the cottages, traditional Turkish tiling in the showers, and ample coffee-making accoutrement (very important). After a long day of travel, we settled in for the night.

The next day, early morning light pierced through the window. We awoke to the picture-framed Geyik Sivrisi, a 1715m bald peak that shimmered in the rising sun. We took our time sitting on the deck of our bungalow sipping Turkish coffee and gawking at the surroundings. We couldn’t wait to get climbing.

sarkit sector over flying goat
Photo source: Flying Goat

The Climbing:

Geyikbayırı has over 1,300 routes ranging from 5a to 8c+. We excitedly reviewed the guide book for different sectors we wanted to climb. We started by walking across the street.

The Sarkit sector hovers over the camp and looks on with gaping caves and classic Mediterranean limestone tufas. It’s just 5 minutes from the hostel.

All the other sectors are within a 30 minute walk. Given the breadth of climbing and terrain, you can find crags to climb in the shade at all times of the day and even in the rain.

IMG_5573.JPG
Photo by friend of the author

Accommodation Details:

  • 8 bungalows (for 1-4 people each). Find pricing here
  • 9-person dorm
  • 2 tents for camping (if you need to rent) + camp space (if you have your own)
  • 4 toilets
  • 3 shower stalls (with plenty of hot water)
  • Big “deluxe” common kitchen with plenty of fridge space, dry good storage, pots, pans, utensils (etc.), and stovetop burners
  • 1 soon-to-be sauna
  • Laundry service
  • Bread delivery daily (which we took full advantage of)
  • Guidebooks available
  • And free çay (pronounced “chai”, aka tea)!
main building flying goat
Photo source: Flying Goat
flying goat dorm
Photo source: Flying Goat

Supplies:

You’ll want to stock up on food as Flying Goat does not have a restaurant on site.

You could eat out each day if really you wanted, there are restaurants in the area, including up the hill in Geyikbayırı and at other camps such as JoSiTo. But then you’d miss out on half the fun of staying there. So don’t do that.

Akdamlar is the closest town and features a daily market, a larger Sunday market, and grocery stores. Geyikbayırı only has smaller bodegas.

Your best bet is to pick up groceries on your way to camp (if you catch a shuttle from the airport, for example) or to hitchhike down to town.

How to Get There:

Antalya Airport is a 45 minute drive (38 km) to the camp (& hostel). You can find the location on Google Maps here.

Three transportation options:

  1. Shuttle pick-up at the airport: Flying Goat can organize a pick-up for € 40 (for up to 4 passengers, then € 10 for each additional person ). We did this, it was simple and easy.
  2. Public Transport (from Flying Goat’s website): “Getting to Geyikbayiri by bus takes around 2 to 3 hours and the fare is around € 5,-. Take any bus from the airport to the central bus station and from there take bus 516 or 521 to Geyikbayiri. Or check the app MOOVIT for alternative routes. Missed the last bus? Catch a cab or hitchhike the last kilometers up hill.”
  3. Rent a car at Antalya Airport. It’s quite cheap: We rented a Renault Clio for our last four days of the trip (to visit Olympos and Çıralı), which cost ~ € 50.

Conclusion:

If you find yourself climbing in Geyikbayırı (you should) and you’re looking for a social place to stay, go to Flying Goat.


Will you be climbing in Istanbul? Be sure to visit Ballikayalar, the best outdoor climbing near the city, or Boulder Istanbul, my favorite bouldering gym on the Asian side.

3 thoughts on “The Flying Goat Camp & Hostel: All About Community In Geyikbayırı, Turkey (Climbing Hostel Review)

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