Training Journal: 4/8/19 – 4/14/19

First time outside bouldering this season! Wahoo! 3 climbing sessions, 1 step-up session, 1 yoga session. Really should keep up my running…

Monday
2h of yoga.


Tuesday
30 minutes of step-ups. 1,080 ft. vertical, carrying 42lbs.

Wednesday
2 hr. of top-roping: 5.10-5.12-. Mostly crimpy, pinchy, balancey routes.

Thursday
2 hr. of bouldering. V4-V8. Didn’t spend a lot of time resting, wanted to try a lot of different problems.

Friday
Rest day.

Saturday
First time bouldering outside this Year! Sent several V1s, V3, almost completed a V5, did some traversing and just playing around on the rock.

Sunday
Rest Day.

Feature photo source: The author

Training Journal: 4/1/19 – 4/7/19

3x toproping, 1 run, 1 workout, 1 long stretching session. I wanted to run 2x, but started to feel sick this weekend. Enjoying toproping again, want to get back into leading. Weeee!

Monday
Workout:
1) Squats (bodyweight): 5×20, Pushups: 5×25, Deltoid front and side raises: 5x10x10
2) Lunges (10# in opposite hand raised OH): 3×10, Shoulder presses (10#): 3×10, Serratus pushups: 3×20
3) 1-Leg DL: 3×10, Shoulder circles (2.5#): 3x20s, Forearm curls and extensors (12#): 3×25

Tuesday
1.5h of toproping. Mostly focused on the 5.10+ to 5.11 range.

Wednesday
My body never really settled into the run. It felt okay, but not great.


Thursday
1.5h of toproping. Mostly focused on the 5.10+ to 5.11 range. A few boulders afterwards, core, and shoulder exercises.

Friday
Rest day, did a lot of stretching.

Saturday
Rest day. Was feeling sick.

Sunday
1.5h of toproping. Mostly focused on the 5.10+ to 5.11 range.

Feature photo source: Climbing Business Journal

Training Journal: 3/25/19 – 3/31/19

3x bouldering, 1 run, 1 step-up session. Glad the business trip is over and I can get back to more of a routine.

Monday
1.5h bouldering. Wide range of levels, (V2-V6), just trying to variety. + a long walk home in the rain…

Tuesday
Body felt slow, weak. It was hard to push the pace, my legs just didn’t seem to want to move.

Wednesday
1.5h bouldering. V4-V6 range. Played a game at the end where we kept building one more onto the route, so it became a strength endurance exercise.

Thursday
Rest day. All day event.

Friday
Rest day. Cross country flight home.

Saturday
1.5h bouldering. V4-V7 range.

Sunday
25 minutes of step-ups, 900ft. of elevation, 40 lbs.

Training Journal: 3/18/19 – 3/24/19

I’m on a business trip (10 days), that I’m kinda kicking myself for how long it is because it’s getting in the way of climbing and step-up with a lot of weight.

Oh well. One bouldering session (the day before I left), one run, one hike (thank god).

Monday
1:50 of bouldering. V3-V6s, focusing on pinches, crimps.

Tuesday
Flew into CA, felt tired and groggy, but forced myself to go on a run.


Wednesday
4×25 bodyweight squats
4×50 pushups
7x7s hangs (1 pad) on a door frame
3×10 one-leg deadlifts
3×20

Thursday
20 minutes of step-ups, 400ft. of elevation, no weight.

Friday
50 pullups
75 bodyweight squats
8x10s finger hangs
3×10 hanging crunches

Saturday
Rest day.

Sunday
8 mile hike, ~2,000 ft. of elevation, through the hills around Pacifico, CA.

https://onthegomap.com

Training Journal: 3/11/19 – 3/17/19

This was a week of 2s: Bouldered 2x, two step-up workouts, two rest days, and well, one run.

My strength and coordination is getting back to normal for bouldering, and my endurance for step-ups is improving. Bumped up weight to 40 lbs. too.

Nice long run of 90 minutes, continuing to increase time each week.


Monday
Rest day.

Tuesday
1.5h bouldering. This was an endurance-focused workout, doing 4x4s on mainly V2s, V3s, with a V4 and V5 thrown in. Worked on crimps, pinches, slabs.

Wednesday
30:00 of step-ups with 40 lbs., 960 vertical feet.

4×10 one-leg deadlifts
4×50 pushups

Thursday
2h bouldering. Projecting on V6s, V7s, V8s. Worked on crimps, slopers, slabby, pulls at odd angles.

Friday
35:00 of step-ups with 40 lbs., 1,050 vertical feet.

Saturday
Rest day.

Sunday
Felt stronger than last week, and picked up speed towards the end. I felt I could run a few more miles. Took a bit of time to get to an easy breathing rhythm, so I may try starting more slowly and gaining speed as I go along next week.

Training Journal: 3/4/19 – 3/10/19

Ah, this week felt good. Bouldered 3x and my strength is starting to come back. One session was for power-endurance and the body responded well, I was able to focus on each move through the repeats. The long run was surprisingly strong in snowy, drizzly conditions.

View of Boston in the distance, from atop Prospect Hill Park in Waltham.


Monday
42:00 of step-ups with 25 lbs. 1,386 vertical feet.

Tuesday
1.5h bouldering. This was an endurance-focused workout, doing 4x4s on V2s and V3s. Worked on crimps, pinches, slabs.

Wednesday
Rest

Thursday
2h bouldering. Projecting on V6s and V7s with lower grades interspersed. Worked on crimps, small edges, chips for footholds/ balance work, slopers, body tension, etc.

Friday
Went running on a trail that ended up being too icy and snowy. Too much sliding around, so I cut the run short.

Saturday
Morning: Hike in the woods. Casual, some uphill.

Afternoon: 1h bouldering. Went with a friend who wasn’t having a great time so this was a relaxed session. Worked at a V4-V5 range, focusing on crimps and pinches.

Sunday
The GPS was acting funky and incorrectly recorded the distance and speed for the first few miles. This was closer to 8.5 miles and a 9:30 min. pace.

The week before, in Dublin, I was seriously struggling on the 70 min. run. This week the body felt a little slow at the start, but things came together throughout and I finished strong.




Feature photo by the author.

We Seek Suffering (Suffering is Optional)

“Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but – I hope – into a better shape.” ― Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

The floorboards creaked and bowed under my weight. I stopped to move the turned over paint bucket–masquerading as exercise equipment–to the side, and hopefully to more stable slats. The soft thud of foot-up-and-foot-down became muted. I resumed stepping. 

Up and down. Up and down. Up and down. For 45 minutes.

This exercise is known as step-ups, and the beauty lies in the self-explanatory name à la description à la simplicity of action. The purpose is to prepare your body for uphill walking with a weighted pack (i.e., if you don’t have easy access to a mountain or you like the convenience of working out at home).

It’s a mindless task really. For the first 15 minutes or so it’s palatable. Then it becomes brutally boring. It’s nothing like walking or hiking or running in the woods. There’s no beauty to fall into, no change of scenery or rock or roots to keep our attention focused. It’s just you and a step. It’s self-contained, repetitive, and grating on the will.

In this Facebook group I’m a part of, some of the mountaineers will do step-ups for two, three hours. They say they go a little mad.

Why? For what end?

Because they’re a little off the rocker? Probably. (I hope to join them in that madhouse someday soon, though.)

But there’s more. 

This is about what the act represents: Literal steps towards mountain dreams. Because you can’t always be in the mountains, but you can train for when you do get there. Because you need to.

It’s about pain re-framed. It’s about defining your suffering, not letting it define you.

“Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”

― Haruki Murakami quoting a runner from a International Herald Tribune article, in What I Talk About When I Talk About Running.

Suffering is our relationship to pain. It’s meaning making. We can choose to relate to the pain with purpose, even find enjoyment in it, or let it become misery.

For example, I choose to stay in shape because I know in the long-run it will be better for me. I certainly enjoy running, lifting, and climbing but not always. Some days you don’t want to be active–no way, hell no–but that long-term vision gets me out there more often than not because I’m pretty sure my future self is going to thank me. And lo and behold, usually after I get going I fall in rhythm and enjoy the activity. 

Let’s clarify a bit further about the companions of pain and suffering.

Pain is the physical and mental stabbings, the body breaking down, the mental fatigue. It is an inevitable part of life, especially if you’re into long distance running (as Murakami is) or have any sort of human relationship ever.

(For example, I’ve had a few parents now tell me a similar narrative, “Your children are your greatest love and joy, and they are guaranteed to break your heart.” You don’t get one (love) without the other (heartbreak)).

Suffering on the other hand is the story we tell ourselves about the pain. This narrative very quickly usurps the discomfort and frames the entirety of the experience. 

Photo by asoggetti on Unsplash

Pain Is Temporary, Suffering Can Last a Lifetime. 

Therein lies the crux of it: How we relate to suffering matters more than the pain itself because it becomes the experience.

Nothing Lost, Nothing Gained. Or Rather, Never Really Lived.

We like to think that one of our primary drives is to reduce pain. But what do you make of all the people that actively go seek it out? 

Ultra-runners, mountaineers, triathletes… These are long and grueling activities that no one describes as “fun” during the event itself. Only afterwards, upon reflection, does satisfaction permeate. Their pain is reframed into an appreciation of a project completed after a whole lot of work, and it brings a smile to one’s face.

These athletes often talking about feeling most alive during their events.

Why is that? In part, pain evolved to bring you to your senses, to make you acutely aware of what’s going on inside and around you. Pain helps you to live in the present.

What does this say about our values hierarchy as a species? 

For one, maybe we care more about accomplishment and personal growth than mitigating pain.

Think of it this way, the only time you don’t experience pain is when you’re dead. Maybe if you’re not experiencing pain you’re not really living.

Photo by Dino Reichmuth on Unsplash

Be Mindful of What You Spend Your Energy On

In this day and age, we say we want an easy life, but the irony is that we don’t really give a shit about something that comes without effort. What we spend our time on inevitably has meaning for us, and the harder we work, the more it matters.

Psychology backs this up, the Sunk Cost Fallacy suggests you are more willing to commit to something you’ve already invested in. The more energy you dedicate to something, the more devoted you feel towards it.

Perhaps in some small way that’s why people choose to spend so much time in their job. Because it’s the easy, most obvious thing to commit yourself to (wrongly or rightly).

The questions you might want to ask yourself: Are you clear with what you are trying to achieve at the end of this hard work? Is this something worth experiencing pain for? How are you framing your relationship to the pain?

One Small Step at at Time 

“Man, the bravest of animals and the one most accustomed to suffering, does not repudiate suffering as such; he desires it, he even seeks it out, provided he is shown a meaning for it, a purpose of suffering.” ― Friedrich Nietzsche 

The room heats up and there’s a heaviness to the saturated air. The weathered light from the hanging bulb casts long shadows about the room. Sweat pools on my back where the backpack sits. In a short while I take a quick break to crack open a window. 

In the cool breeze I think of the pain and boredom, then of the majesty of mountains, and go back to take the next step. 



Photo source: Mountain Life